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MOSS Introduction to Robotics Unit

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This topic contains 15 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Hamza khan 3 years ago.

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  • #3788

    Christie Veitch
    Participant

    As you introduce MOSS to your classes and student groups, you can also introduce key concepts in robotics – understanding what robots are and do, and why humans have and make robots by building them, and in the process learning about sensors, actuators, and basic principles in engineering and design.

    These lesson plans are designed to scale from 10 years old (4th and 5th graders) all the way up to 18 years old (12th graders+) and beyond with appropriate activities, robot building challenges, and investigations for a range of age groups.

    Lesson 1: Cars and Vehicles I

    Students explore the intersection of engineering, design, and robotics by working to make cars and other vehicles. In this first lesson, students simultaneously practice understanding and building with the core MASS modules – battery, sensors, and actuators. As they understand how to configure them to make a working robot they pursue making cars and vehicles.

    Download the lesson here!
    http://web2.modrobotics.com/edu/MOSS/IntroToRobotics_MOSS-Cars_I.pdf

    Lesson 2: Cars and Vehicles II
    Students continue to explore basic robotics and making cars, now adding elements that allow them to vary their designs and widen their battery power circuit with power-passing modules.

    Download the lesson here!
    http://web2.modrobotics.com/edu/MOSS/IntroToRobotics_MOSS-Cars_II.pdf

    Lesson 3: Robots that do jobs I

    In the third day of learning robotics through building MOSS robots, students embark on thinking about robots as specialized and “smart” tools to do specialized tasks and jobs. As they explore designing and building robots with the goal to have them do jobs, they also are given the opportunity to add elements that route data through a larger circuit, and to add design elements.

    Download the lesson here!
    http://web2.modrobotics.com/edu/MOSS/IntroToRobotics_MOSS-Jobs_I.pdf

    Lesson 4: Robots that do jobs II

    In this fourth day of Introduction to Robotics, students continue to consider why we have robots that do tasks for us. Students iterate on their robot designs to make them better suited for jobs, and to practice routing data and power through wider circuits and the engineering and design possibilities this opens up!

    Download the lesson here!
    http://web2.modrobotics.com/edu/MOSS/IntroToRobotics_MOSS-Jobs_II.pdf

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 2 months ago by  Eric Lundby.
    #3889

    tom MOULDS
    Participant

    Christie,

    I am going to try and adapt you lesson plans to introduce robotics to 1st and 2nd graders. I think a primary teaching tool will be my sons MOSS Zombonitron kit! I will post any updates and how it goes…if I get any kids to sign up!

    Would it be possible to get the lesson plans in work format, I wanted to move some of the thoughts and ideas to powerpoint for classroom slides.

    Great start

    #3890

    Christie Veitch
    Participant

    Hi Tom – I love hearing from educators who are interested in using our lesson plans – not only do I enjoy sharing ideas, I’m always excited when someone tells me they’ll let me know how it goes.

    I think the Zombonitron is an incredibly versatile starting point for MOSS. this summer I ran a robot camp using MOSS and we used Zombonitron modules for almost the entirety of their building challenges.

    I do not have the lesson plans in Word format since that was not the source I created them in. I would happily share the source and you could easily import that document to Word. Please email directly at christie@modrobotics.com so I can work out sending these (and the future lessons I’m about to post) to you! Let me know how else I can help as well – it would be my pleasure.

    #3895

    tom MOULDS
    Participant

    Hi Christie!

    I sent an email, thanks for the response.

    #3946

    Christie Veitch
    Participant

    Hi Tom, Just wanted to circle back and tell you I sent the source documents for the MOSS lesson plans!

    #4178

    Gellert Nagy
    Participant

    Hi Christie,

    Can you please send me the same.

    Thanks a lot,
    Gellert

    #4179

    tom MOULDS
    Participant

    Hi Christie!

    Yes I got them, I probably just reply via email and forgot to post. My elective I start with 1st and 2nd graders start in a few weeks, I will let you know how it goes. I am modifying the first lesson plan now, since I only have on MOSS Zombonitron and about 15 kids. We will probably build some “robots” with paper and iPad app.

    Thanks, Tom

    #4281

    tom MOULDS
    Participant

    Hi All,

    I just wanted to put out a few comments on out experience with an elective class for 1st and 2nd graders on intro to robotics. A few lesson’s learned.

    First, from a Modular Robotics perspective, we did not have access to cubelets and only a single MOSS kit. I really would have liked to try a cubelets kit the future, since the MOSS it was great for one-on-one, but too hard for a group of kids to create with on there own. We had 13 kids, some chaos at times.

    What worked:
    The video’s from the web where a good start to the class, but most of them too high of a level, still they had fun watching them.

    We took apart a Rumba and had a different vacuum cleaner robot, which was good to shoe them different robot parts.

    MOSS robot was great for showing them components and introducing sensors and actuators (Motors).

    We where able to find some free Lego mindstorm kits for building, these worked pretty well, but they where a little too advanced and brittle, so I have to do most of the building and than let them experiment with them.

    The game robot turtles, it did seem to help them think about programming.

    The goal of the effort was tug-o-bot and in the end that worked out well. The strongest robot moved by sounds, so the kids could cheer for it to win. The louder they were the harder it pulled. Fun for them!

    What did not work:

    The ability to build as a team, I really needed 13 kits so they could all build at there own pace.
    Computers to allow them to program in scratch. The school had plenty, but we did not have time to get them set up.

    Over all it was fun, but we need to work on the resource issues and get a educators kit. Will have to start saving money!

    Thanks, Tom

    #4291

    Christie Veitch
    Participant

    Hi Tom,

    It sounds like you took on a challenge and did a great job weaving together lots of resources and experiences for your 1st and 2nd graders.

    I will tell you what we have found works best:

    First, lots of roads to success – this could include videos, small focused experiments where we engineer success (“build joints and hinges” while not giving any sensors, actuators, or batteries, “can you make just these three pieces work so that the motor is controlled by a sensor and both are powered by a battery?”), 2D designing and intentional robot design by drawing out design, using our interactive instructions on the robot recipes, and also using the lesson plans.

    Second – a lot of differentiated progress. As you said, you’d had more kits, you could have had smaller groups moving at varying speeds through the lesson pan or goals for robot building.

    The hard part here is that your age group was a bit younger than we are aiming with MOSS. I can imagine that was really challenging. MOSS is a more complex product, and also smaller – it requires both some manual dexterity, and also the ability to tinker intentionally. It’s an 8+ product so your grades were right at that line. And truthfully, for larger groups, I am often working with ages 9-10+ for all the reasons you named. With some older kids, sharing, differentiated progress, and ability to manage progress are a little more feasible.

    I’d love to talk to you more about Cubelets, what we’re currently doing to support Computational Thinking and building programming skills, and what we have cooking for future Cubelets educational tie-ins. Please feel free to email me directly at christie@modrobotics.com at any time if you want more info or want to share ideas further. thanks for telling us so much about what worked and what didn’t here – I know other educators will benefit!

    #4324

    Anita Kumari
    Participant

    hi dear Christie Veitch,

    we have started with 6+ ages on both moss and cubelets, we are really happy with modrobotics kits. we have already used number of other robotics kits, the problem with these kits is either their assebly take too much time and is complex for K-12 or the behaviour is very simple.

    we are running a test batch of around 20 kids. the motive of program is fun learming.

    at first we left them with kits and let them play, than we introduce them with each block and their function. now after complete understanding of each cube they have to make their robot in a particular way with limited cube. It feels so good when they are able to make by their own. sometime we give them little hint and that work too well.they can easily apply pass block and invert but the real problem is when they have to apply min and max block. at this stage they want a push.

    moss is itself a great learning for me. every time the students are introduced with new behavior and system. and variety of ways to drive moss robots. little struggle is when children make unbalanced model and it collapse.

    lot to speak about and lot to learn looking ahed for wonderful outcome.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 10 months ago by  Anita Kumari.
    #4331

    Christie Veitch
    Participant

    Hi Anita,

    I fully understand that MOSS would be very complex for the students younger than 8 in your programs. MOSS is an 8 and up product, and in fact, if you look at the MOSS lesson plans we’re recommending that most educators use them with groups of students ages 10 and up. We find that the manual dexterity needed for MOSS is greater than what 6 year olds really are capable of, and also those that can intentionally tinker and keep track of what they’ve done and tried will learn best, as you described your own learning, In our lesosn plans, we are aiming at topics that are better suited for students ages 10+ as well.

    It sounds like you have a great progression worked out for Cubelets! I am also fond of having students experiment to understand individual Cubelet functions. In this lesson plan you’ll find some examples of ways to set up those experiments so that they’ll work both to help students better understand Cubelets, but also to practice scientific method.

    Once students know more, having some engineering constraints or some criteria for “can you make a robot that will ___” can really raise the students robot building and motivation. That’s why we offer so many open ended challenges! (Here are just a few in case you haven’t seen them).

    I hope this helps you keep going and am always available to answer questions as you keep working with MOSS, Cubelets, and more students.

    #4333

    Anita Kumari
    Participant

    thank you Christie Veitch,

    #5150

    Barry Peet
    Participant

    Hi Christie,

    could you send me the Word files of the Education plans? I want to translate them to Dutch so I can use them here in Holland…

    Regards Barry

    #5228

    Christie Veitch
    Participant

    Hi Barry,

    I’m responding to your email to our main company account right now too. Our source files are not in Word, but I would be happy to share them with you if it helps you get less ons ready for students and teachers you are working with. We publish our education materials with a CC-SA license – “Creative Commons – Share Alike.” This means that we love it when people want to use our lessons and revise or rewrite them. We ask only that if you republish what you write that you: 1.) Give credit for the original ideas to Modular Robotics somewhere in tiny print 2.) Also offer it on a CC-SA license so that another educator can do the same!

    #5729

    Hamza khan
    Participant

    Hi

    Please tell me about power rating oflipo battery using in MOSS kits.

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